New Gallup polls find drug use increases as people’s sense of wellbeing lessens - Novusdetox

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New Gallup polls find drug use increases as people’s sense of wellbeing lessens

It’s apparently no coincidence that the states ranking lowest for a sense of wellbeing among its citizens are also the states with the highest consumption of mood-altering drugs.

A nationwide Gallup poll, called “The State of the States” poll, has found that Kentuckians, Rhode Islanders and West Virginians consume the most mood-altering drugs, both prescription and illicit, in the nation.

And another Gallup poll has found that the least happy and satisfied people in the nation live – guess where: West Virginia and Kentucky and to a lesser extent, Rhode Island.

Anyone with an interest in drug use and abuse, drug addiction and treatment, should pay attention to these two polls. They reveal a lot about why people get caught up in drugs and alcohol. And they may help point the way to a faster, more successful recovery.

Every drug and alcohol user has his or her own reasons for consuming more than is considered healthy. But the Gallup polls suggest that each person’s story likely includes some of the common depression and lack of fulfillment that is widespread in each state.

And when more people all around you are using so many drugs and alcohol, a tacit sort of agreement about it can begin to filter into the community. The whole take-a-pill-or-smoke-a-joint-when-you’re-feeling-down thing takes on a sort of legitimacy. It breeds and spreads and becomes “the norm.”

Gallup’s “State of the States” survey polled 450 residents from each of the 50 states. It asked how often they took mood-altering drugs or medication, including prescription drugs, “to help them relax” – that is, try to make the rest of your crappy day a little better than it usually is.

West Virginians reported using such substances the most – 28 percent said they took drugs to relax almost every day. Rhode Islanders were next, at 25.9 percent, and Kentuckians were third with 24.5 percent. Alaskans reported the least drug use with only 13.5 percent.

The other Gallup poll found West Virginia and Kentucky two of the lowest-ranking states in terms of a simple sense of wellbeing.

“It’s no coincidence that drug use was inversely proportionate to the wellbeing score,” said lead researcher Dan Witters. In other words, the worse you feel about yourself and life the more drugs you reach for on a daily basis. Witters said that these feelings “increase the chances of drug use.” He pointed to such factors as obesity or even poor workplace performance contributing to a feelings of depression, a sense of low self-esteem and generalized stress – all of which can lead to drug use as compensation.

When a quarter of the population can’t – or won’t try to – get through a day without some sort of chemical assistance, there’s definitely something wrong going on. Whatever that is, these states are also among the highest in the nation for heroin and prescription opioid addictions and overdose deaths, marijuana use among teenagers, and alcoholism.

And when there’s a lot of agreement that taking drugs is an okay thing to do, you tend to see an escalation of it. And before long, it leads to dangerous drug abuse and all the tragic results that go along with that.

According to a Medical Daily report, the Gallup wellbeing survey noted that the keys to more wellbeing are found in “a variety of health, workplace and societal factors, from obesity status to the development of disease, and workplace performance to crime rates.”

Gallup defined the “five elements of wellbeing” as purpose, social, financial, community, and physical health. “States and local communities can use wellbeing concepts and the five elements as focal points in designing initiatives to improve wellbeing,” the Gallup poll said. “It’s likely that if people have a sense of wellbeing in these areas, they’d be less likely to use drugs.”

Here at Novus, we are frequently reminded of the complex personal battles being waged (and won) by our patients, and how these issues relate to the larger areas of their lives – often close to those “five elements” as seen by the Gallup pollsters.

If you or anyone you care for is using mood-altering substances to “relax and just get through the day” don’t hesitate to call us. We’ll do our best to answer your questions and see that you get the best and most appropriate help available.

There is hope for a new life. Call to speak to one of our experienced & caring detox advisors today!

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