Florida’s New Pill Mill Law Will Drive Up Demand For Oxycodone Detox Programs

Florida’s new law aimed at controlling the state’s out-of-control “pill mills” has been signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott.

By closing or curtailing the illegal activities of pill mills, the new law will bring to an end Florida’s reputation as the leading supplier of fraudulently obtained prescription painkillers in the country.

Countless people in the grip of oxycodone addiction who rely on Florida’s pill mills now have a golden opportunity to avoid the nightmare of finding alternative sources, and instead, consider oxycodone detox and a new, drug-free life.

Novus Medical Detox Center offers medical oxycodone detox programs that are safer, and much more comfortable than the usual hit-and-miss, one-size-fits-all programs offered everywhere else.

OXYCODONE DETOX IS SAFER AND MORE COMFORTABLE AT NOVUS MEDICAL DETOX CENTER.

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What the new pill mill law does

Pill mills — the popular nickname for the state’s hundreds of walk-in pain-management clinics — are the main source of dangerous and addictive prescription painkillers, particularly oxycodone and OxyContin, for nearly as many addicts and drug dealers as legitimate pain patients. It is a widely known fact that Florida pill mills contribute to oxycodone addiction in numerous states, as well as in Florida.

Florida’s new pill mill law, HB 7095, is serious get-tough legislation. The new law targets doctors who overprescribe opioid painkillers, clamps down on pharmacy practices, requires drug wholesalers to report distribution data, and authorizes — at last — the much anticipated Florida prescription-drug monitoring database.

In more detail, the new law:

  • Requires doctors to report to the Health Department when they start and stop working at a pain clinic.
  • Levies fines of $10,000, and 6-month suspensions, on physicians who “over-prescribe” painkillers.
  • Will prohibit physicians from dispensing many addictive narcotics such as OxyContin, oxycodone and similar drugs; only pharmacies will be licensed to dispense such drugs.
  • Requires doctors to transfer narcotics in their possession back to the distributors in a mandatory “buy-back” program after dispensing prohibition goes into effect.
  • Makes painkiller prescriptions and pain treatment plans technically more difficult for the average doctor to write.
  • Addresses prescription forgery by requiring electronic or counterfeit-proof prescription pads, which must be purchased from Health Department-approved vendors; and vendors must report monthly sales to the state.
  • Requires pharmaceutical wholesaler/suppliers to report to the state all sales of controlled substances.
  • Eliminates the need for a search warrant for law enforcement officers to view and copy a pain clinic’s records.
  • Allows only seven days for pharmacies to report prescription information to the drug database, and levies a charge of first-degree misdemeanor on pharmacists who knowingly fail to report to authorities any attempts to purchase drugs fraudulently.
  • Creates the long-awaited prescription drug monitoring database program, but bars pharmaceutical companies from funding any portion of the program to avoid conflicts of interest.

The first year or so of the program has already been funded through donations, federal grants and other means. A group of local law enforcement agencies has reportedly offered to pay for the database out of funds forfeited through drug busts.

AN OXYCODONE DETOX PROGRAM IS THE START OF A NEW LIFE.

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Gruesome statistics point up need for oxycodone detox

Since Gov. Scott instituted his statewide multi-level “strike force” in March, 2011, to combat pill mills and prescription drug fraud directly, more than 350 arrests have been made. The new “pill mill bill” will add even more fire-power to the state’s efforts to reduce prescription drug carnage.

The same day that Gov. Scott signed the new bill, search warrants were executed in an Orlando pill mill investigation. Orlando Police allege that a single physician there dispensed more pills than the entire state of California. Records show that California dispensed 303,000 oxycodone pills in one year, so we get a idea of the scope what’s been happening in Florida — we have over 1,000 pill mills in the state.

Pill mills peddle a huge variety of dangerous drugs, including widely-abused benzodiazepines (benzos) like Valium and Xanax. But prescription painkillers are the top killers. The four most notorious are oxycodone, OxyContin (time-release oxycodone), hydrocodone and methadone.

Recent statistics show that on average, 2,500 people — seven every day — die every year in Florida from abuse of oxycodone and other narcotic painkillers, especially oxycodone, OxyContin, hydrocodone and methadone. In Florida, oxycodone deaths surged 61% in one year.

Figures like these point up the dire need for effective oxycodone detox programs that will allow those trapped by oxycodone addiction to begin their journey back to a drug-free life. A personally tailored, medically supervised OxyContin detox program, like that offered by Novus Medical Detox Center in Pasco County, FL, is the kind of program that delivers more safety, more comfort and more privacy than most others.

BREAK FREE FROM OXYCODONE ABUSE AND ADDICTION.

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OXYCONTIN DETOX IS MORE COMFORTABLE AT NOVUS.

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